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20130130
20130130
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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
's fortunes rise again? >> the injury suffered by an activist in pakistan were so intense that a piece of her skull ended up in her abdomen. now, they will prepare to remove it and put it back in her skull. the doctors said she had made a remarkable recovery. >> her injury was life- threatening. a recovery so far is described as remarkable. weeks after malala yousafzai walked out of the hospital, they are preparing for her next major challenge. the government's bullet ripped a large chunk out of her skull. -- the attackers bullet ripped a large chunk out of her skull. now, they are preparing a titanium plate to repair the whole. >> this is a small defect. this is very adaptable. this is an easy battle to work with. >> malala yousafzai was attacked for defying a taliban edict. shot in the head at point-blank range as she traveled home from school. the taliban gunmen left her for dead but she emerged at the chaos of life. there was emergency surgery in pakistan and then the airlift to birmingham possible class medical facilities. her story has become a global news. a school girl turned into a n
. >> this program gave us an enormous amount of information about al qaeda in pakistan. the administration continues to use the intelligence every day in drone strikes. it is not just actable intelligence but how they operate. since the program was shut down we have seen the emergence of al qaeda in the arabian peninsula. we have had the emergence of al-shabab merging with al qaeda central. and al qaeda in africa. are we struggling in a way? the information we have on pakistan and the lack of information, is it harder to get the intelligence we need because we do not have this tool? >> one of the most important threads of information that i saw when i got there and still in 2006, late in the game, was detainee information. i already suggested to you that i am willing to adjust the detainee program. we have other penetrations and sources and knowledge. we have a better sense of the imminence of attack, what state of danger we are in as a nation. i told you we entered the black side in 2006. - the black site into a dozen sex. -- in 2006. lazy journalists sometimes they we closed them. we did not. we k
tried to smooth out relations with leaders in afghanistan and pakistan. residents of a three-story building are looking for a new place to live.
either. look at pakistan where the president has gone all-in on drones six times more attacks by drones under president obama than under george w. bush. pakistanis, 94% of them think drones kill innocent people. what do we get out of this? >> here's the trade-off. the problem is, this part of africa is one of the big problem spots for the u.s. intelligence community. i travel with general carter hamm, head of the military's africa command, this month and he told me this is one of the real blind spots for u.s. intelligence agencies. they don't have good ways of collecting intelligence. they don't have good spy networks on the ground. so introducing these drones will get a head start on trying to monitor some of these militant networks including the al qaeda affiliate there. >> people might say who cares about drones. lot of people in this country say look, we don't want to risk american lives. if we're going to have to fly over and kill quote, unquote bad guys with drones, so be it. let's do it. there are people on the left and the right who agree about that. they say what about the paki
blackberry's fortunes rise again? >> the injury suffered by an activist in pakistan were so intense that a piece of her skull ended up in her abdomen. now, they will prepare to remove it and put it back in her skull. the doctors said she had made a remarkable recovery. >> her injury was life- threatening. a recovery so far is described as remarkable. weeks after malala yousafzai walked out of the hospital, they are preparing for her next major challenge. the government's bullet ripped a large chunk out of her skull. -- the attackers bullet ripped a large chunk out of her skull. now, they are preparing a titanium plate to repair the whole. >> this is a small defect. this is very adaptable. this is an easy battle to work with. >> malala yousafzai was attacked for defying a taliban edict. shot in the head at point-blank range as she traveled home from school. the taliban gunmen left her for dead but she emerged at the chaos of life. there was emergency surgery in pakistan and then the airlift to birmingham possible class medical facilities. her story has become a global news. a school
we see in pakistan and other places. also in north africa and yemen sometimes when they fire the missiles and take out targets from the air. these are going to be just for surveillance, out there gathering intelligence. the thing you are talking about in this neighborhood is it is hard to have human intelligence. the cia has a network of people that give them information. in this part of the world, in this neighborhood, they don't. they have little intel. the drones will be up there looking for movements of groups they are worried about. >> do we think there is significant numbers of al qaeda in niger? >> in the neighborhood. this is the concern in mali. what happened in the north when the al qaeda linked groups, the islamists came over to take over what was a separatist regime at the time and hijacked it, you have groups spread across this area that encompasses many countries. you can see they are starting to work together. that worries a lot of people. >> i don't know if you can answer this question. how much does this pose a direct threat to us here in the united states wh
with extraordinary care because some of the opposition that we get in parts of pakistan and other parts of the world come from a perception of american arrogance in the use of things like drones. so it's got to be a very mature balanced approach. stuart: would it be true to say that we're withdrawing boots on the ground to fight al qaeda and using high in the sky look down shoot em stuff? >> well, you won't win a war that way because it can only be part of a strategy, and president obama has made that clear. but in a place like afghanistan or even pakistan, what you are really counting on is the host nation forces standing up and doing their part to control areas of the ground on the population. and then in combination, they can be very effective. stuart: general, i want to talk about your book because i have actually read much of it. my share of the task. it is a good book. very easy read. to me it was almost like a thriller. it was great stuff. i have a question for you, you are obviously a very talented man, in the military, brilliant organizer, how are you going to put those talents to work in t
administration, helping mend strained relations with afghanistan and pakistan. during kerry'ses nomination, president obama called him the perfect person for the job. >> i think it's fair to say that few individuals know as many presidents and prime ministers or grasp our foreign policies as firmly as john kerry. and this makes him a perfect choice to guide american diplomacy in the years ahead. >> meanwhile, in a shocking move, wisconsin senator ron johnson voted for john kerry's confirmation today. see, on thursday johnson was kind of put in his place by senator kerry after trying to make a scene over benghazi. >> will you work with me then on an ongoing basis so we can get that behind us, so we can find out what actually happened and we can move beyond that. can you just make that commitment to me? >> i think, senator, in all fairness, i think we do know what happened. i think that it is very clear. were you at the briefing with the tapes? >> no. >> well, there was a briefing with tapes which we all saw, those of us who went to it. which made it crystal clear. >> well, senator johnson v
looks like it's dividing itself, it seems reminiscent of pakistan and how its fledgling democracy works between the civilian and the military relationship. >> well, there are a lot of the chronic problems in egypt. no doubt for six years, egypt's major institution was the military. they were the major power brokers, in fact, all of the previous leaders of this country came from the military. mohamed morsi is the first civilian leader to be elected. a lot of people feel that the military and the muslim brotherhood have cut a deal. a lot of people feel the military still pulse a lot of strings behind the scenes of what is happening here. you have a lot of institutional problems in the state as the country tries to grapple with new realities of trying to build democratic institutions that for so many years have been anything but c democratic. >> how can morsi end this crisis? >>. >> well, right now, he feels he has a democratic mandate. he has a large popular base of support. he won the elections. his constitution was passed in a nationwide referendum. his party won a majority in the parli
in pakistan. my job was to try to locate al qaeda fighters were al qaeda leaders and capture them to turn them over to the justice department's and have them face trial. that was the original idea, not to have them sit in cuba for the next decade. but we caught abu zubaydah. he was shot three times by pakistani police as he was tried to escape from his safe house. i was the first person to have custody of him, to sit with him. we spoke to each other extensively. we talked about everything from september 11 to poetry he had been writing to his family. then he was moved on to a secret prison after that. once i got back to headquarters, i heard he had been subject to harsh techniques, then called enhanced interrogation techniques, and i was asked by one of the leaders in this tsa's counter-terrorism center if i wanted to be trained in these of these techniques. i told them i had a moral problem with them and did not want to be involved. fast forward to 2007, by then, human-rights watch and in this international have reported al qaeda prisoners had been tortured and abc news called and said that t
to pakistan and some countries that probably none of us know where he went. there are many times he's come to me and said, i've got to go, and he tells me where he's going, thouing in the newspapers about -- nothing in the newspapers about where he'd gone. but he is a great evaluator of people, and because of that, the president trusts him and has sent him on all these missions. now he will do that as secretary of state. he's authored numerous pieces of legislation to prevent the global spread of h.i.v. aids. he also played a central role in crafting our policy in iraq and afghanistan in the war on traimpleterror. i can remember one time where he spent days and days with president karzai working 0en a difficult issue following the elections that they had there. he'he's been focused on the mide east peace process and israel's security forays entire time on the foreign relations committee. for more than 30 years senator kerry has been a powerful voice for his constituents in massachusetts as well as an engaged citizen of the world. throughout those years john has matched his u unflinching pa
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)